A woman who developed keloids after getting her ears pierced three years ago finally has the painful growths removed on The Bad Skin Clinic.

In tonight’s episode of the Quest Red show, YouTuber Zviko, 23, of London, visits Harley Street dermatological surgeon Dr Emma Craythorne in the hopes of having the scars, which occur when they become larger than the original wound, removed.

Zviko admits she struggles with the discomfort and unsightly appearance of her keloids and worries ‘daily about her condition’.

In an attempt to cope with the three growths, she has given each a name and calls them ‘her children’ – but despite the affectionate approach, the content creator breaks down in tears of relief when she’s shown her keloid-free look following surgery.

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A woman who developed keloids (pictured) after getting her ears pierced three years ago finally has the painful growths removed on The Bad Skin Clinic

Zviko's ear after surgery

A woman who developed keloids (pictured left) after getting her ears pierced three years ago finally has the painful growths removed (pictured right) on The Bad Skin Clinic

In tonight's episode of the Quest Red show, YouTuber Zviko (pictured), 23, of London, visits Harley Street dermatological surgeon Dr Emma Craythorne in the hopes of having the scars, which occur when they become larger than the original wound, removed

In tonight’s episode of the Quest Red show, YouTuber Zviko (pictured), 23, of London, visits Harley Street dermatological surgeon Dr Emma Craythorne in the hopes of having the scars, which occur when they become larger than the original wound, removed

The YouTuber appears to be bright and bubbly upon entering the clinic, but behind the confident front, Zviko admit she’s struggled with her condition. 

‘I am a YouTuber, so I make fitness videos and facial-related videos. I often find myself putting on a brave face, so I try to be as bubbly and as fun as possible,’ she says. 

The growths, which are tightly tucked away behind Zviko’s ears, are keloids, enlarged scar tissue that can develop after minor skin damage. 

Zviko admits she struggles with the discomfort and unsightly appearance of her keloids (pictured) and worries 'daily about her condition'

Zviko admits she struggles with the discomfort and unsightly appearance of her keloids (pictured) and worries ‘daily about her condition’

In an attempt to cope with the three growths (pictured), she has given each a name and calls them 'her children'

In an attempt to cope with the three growths (pictured), she has given each a name and calls them ‘her children’

Away from the cameras, Zviko struggles with the discomfort and unsightly appearance of her keloids, which have taken their toll on her mental health. 

WHAT ARE KELOIDS?

Keloids are types of scars that occur when they become larger than the original wound.

This can be due to minor skin damage, such as acne, and can spread out of the original area and persist for many years.

Keloids affect around 11 million people around the world every year.

A tendency to develop keloids can run in families.

They look like exaggerated scars and are raised above the skin. 

Keloids are shiny and hairless, and can feel hard and rubbery, as well as domed. 

New ones are often red or purple before turning browner as people age.

Most sufferers have just one or two keloids, however, some have many, particularly if they are the result of acne or chickenpox.

Keloids can often not be cured as cutting one out may cause it to be replaced by a larger scar in the same place.

 Source: British Skin Foundation

‘I worry daily about my condition. Everybody wants to be normal, nobody wants to stand out too much from the crowd,’ she says. ‘They just kind of popped up out of nowhere. I have had my keloids for over three years now.’

In an attempt to cope with her condition, Zviko has given each of her individual keloids a name. 

‘I call them my little three children. So my eldest is Jeff, the most painful one. I’ve got my middle child Miranda, and then on the other side is my youngest child, Brittany,’ she reveals. 

Not only does Zviko dislike the look of the scars, they also often cause her pain throughout the day.

She explains: ‘They feel rock hard but kind of squidgy. They haven’t stopped growing and they feel itchy and painful.

‘Throughout the day I just get sharp, shooting pains. It could be random things from being out in the sun for too long, or even if I just knock my ear. It can be excruciating.’

Visiting Dr Emma, Zviko, who noticed the bumps after getting her ears pierced, adds: ‘When you’ve been insecure for so long, it makes you feel trapped. Treatment to me means I can live, I’m just hoping that Dr Emma can make a difference.’  

Taken into surgery, Dr Emma numbs the area around Zviko’s ears before scraping away at and freeing the scar tissue from the YouTuber’s skin.

‘This is hands down my favourite way to remove keloids, just slowly shave it off,’ Dr Emma says as she continues slicing into Zviko’s ear, eventually cutting the keloid off.

‘It’s like peeling the skin off a grape!’ Dr Emma jokes, just as ‘Jeff’ is freed from Zviko’s ear. Mindful the scars could return, Dr Emma injects Zviko’s ears with steroids to stop them from reappearing. 

But despite the affectionate approach, the content creator (pictured) breaks down in tears of relief when she's shown her keloid-free look following surgery

But despite the affectionate approach, the content creator (pictured) breaks down in tears of relief when she’s shown her keloid-free look following surgery

Deciding to leave the smallest scar, Dr Emma hands Zviko a mirror, revealing her brand new, keloid-free look.

Overcome with emotion, a tearful Zviko says: ‘Oh my God. I’m so happy. Thank you so much,’ before boasting: ‘Check out my new ear. I’m just ready to take on the world now.’

The brand new series of The Bad Skin Clinic premieres tonight at 10pm on Quest Red, available to stream on dplay



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