Swarms of Chinese tourists have ditched social distancing rules and flocked to scenic spots in China to enjoy their first major holiday after the country claimed to have contained its COVID-19 outbreak.

Shocking footage from Sunday shows Huangshan Mountain, a famous hiking site in Anhui, jam-packed with people standing shoulder to shoulder, some even without wearing a mask. 

Similar scenes have also been spotted in other popular tourist attractions over the weekend as hundreds of millions of Chinese celebrate the National Day holiday.

Hordes of visitors are pictured at the Datang Everbright City in Xi'an, central China

Huangshan in Anhui, China, was swamped by tourists over the weekend

Swarms of Chinese tourists have ditched social distancing rules to enjoy China’s first major holiday since the country claimed to have contained its COVID-19 outbreak

Shocking footage from Sunday shows Huangshan Mountain, a famous hiking site in Anhui, jam-packed with people

The Datang Everbright City, a popular tourist attraction in central Chinese city Xi¿an, is seen being filled to the brim with tourists over the weekend

Also known as China’s Golden Week, the eight-day holiday starting from October 1 marks the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 as people flock to tourist attractions

Also known as China’s Golden Week, the eight-day holiday starting from October 1 marks the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 and sees an astonishing annual movement of people trying to get home or travel.

But this year has added significance to the country which is rebounding from the coronavirus outbreak and parading the freedom to travel after months long of lockdowns and restrictions.

As travel demand soared following the health crisis, Chinese officials also began promoting what state media called ‘revenge travel’ by offering ticket sales and free entries to beauty spots in a bid to rejuvenate the economy.

Since Thursday, renowned Chinese tourist attractions, including the Great Wall and Shanghai Disneyland, have been swamped with visitors while passengers flooded train stations and airports.

Swarms of tourists are seen visiting the West Lake in Hangzhou

A popular tourist attraction in south-western Chinese city Chengdu is seen being jam-packed with people

As travel demand soared following the health crisis, Chinese officials also began promoting what state media called ‘revenge travel’ during the eight-day National Day holiday by offering ticket sales and free entries to beauty spots in a bid to rejuvenate the economy

The Datang Everbright City in Xi'an is seen being filled to the brim with tourists

Footage filmed in Anhui province¿s Huangshan shows swarms of visitors stuck in a long queue at the hiking site

Swarms of Chinese tourists have flocked to scenic spots around the country to enjoy China’s first major holiday since the country claimed to have contained its COVID-19 outbreak

Since Thursday, renowned Chinese tourist attractions, including the Great Wall and Shanghai Disneyland, have been swamped with visitors. Tourists are pictured visiting the Badaling Great Wall on the fourth day of the National Day and Mid-Autumn Festival holiday on October 4

Since Thursday, renowned Chinese tourist attractions, including the Great Wall and Shanghai Disneyland, have been swamped with visitors. Tourists are pictured visiting the Badaling Great Wall on the fourth day of the National Day and Mid-Autumn Festival holiday on October 4

Visitors line up to get into Kaifengfu, or Yamen of Ancient Kaifeng, a historic site in Kaifeng city, central China's Henan province on October 3 during the eight-day National Day holiday

Visitors line up to get into Kaifengfu, or Yamen of Ancient Kaifeng, a historic site in Kaifeng city, central China’s Henan province on October 3 during the eight-day National Day holiday

Footage filmed in Anhui province’s Huangshan shows swarms of visitors stuck in a long queue at the hiking site without social distancing.

Similar crowded scenes were spotted in cities across the country including Chengdu and Hangzhou. 

The Datang Everbright City, a popular tourist attraction in central Chinese city Xi’an, is seen being filled to the brim with tourists over the weekend.

More than 600 million people are estimated to make trips during the holiday, according to Chinese major travel booking platform Ctrip, forcing the state railway to lay on 1,000 extra trains a day.

Most of them are taking luxury holidays within the country amid the global travel restrictions.

More than 600 million people are estimated to make trips during the holiday, according to Chinese major travel booking platform Ctrip, forcing the state railway to lay on 1,000 extra trains a day. Passengers wait for trains at Zhengzhou East Railway Station on October 1

More than 600 million people are estimated to make trips during the holiday, according to Chinese major travel booking platform Ctrip, forcing the state railway to lay on 1,000 extra trains a day. Passengers wait for trains at Zhengzhou East Railway Station on October 1

Tourists gather to watch a flag lowering ceremony in Tiananmen Square in Beijing today

Tourists gather to watch a flag lowering ceremony in Tiananmen Square in Beijing today

But the absence of their tourist dollars this year will leave regional nations — from Thailand to Cambodia — wincing from the economic pain caused by the prolonged closure of borders.

Life in China has gradually returned to normal after ghostly scenes of empty roads earlier this year as the country has gone nearly two months without reporting any confirmed local transmissions.

As of Tuesday, China has recorded a total of 85,482 confirmed COVID-19 cases while the death toll remains at 4,634.

Globally, the coronavirus has infected over 35 million people and claimed at least 1.04 million deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Life in China has gradually returned to normal after ghostly scenes of empty roads earlier this year as the country has gone over a month without reporting any confirmed local transmissions. Tourists visit the Longmen Grottoes in Luoyang, Henan, on October 4

Life in China has gradually returned to normal after ghostly scenes of empty roads earlier this year as the country has gone over a month without reporting any confirmed local transmissions. Tourists visit the Longmen Grottoes in Luoyang, Henan, on October 4

The news comes as Hong Kong’s health experts have warned a fourth wave of coronavirus infections could soon hit the Chinese-ruled city.

The Asian financial hub had impressive success in tackling the disease with just over 1,400 infections and seven deaths by the end of June.

But it was hit with what officials called ‘a third wave’ from early July, with the infection tally rising nearly fivefold and the death toll surpassing 100 within three months.

Now the city is ‘on the brink of a fourth wave’ of COVID-19 cases caused by untraceable local infections, infected inbound travellers and the approaching flu season, reported South China Morning Post citing experts.



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