Ruby Princess passenger, 70, DIES from coronavirus she caught on the cruise, taking national toll to EIGHT – as it is revealed a staggering 133 passengers have COVID-19

  • A woman in her 70s has died in hospital after contracting COVID-19 on a cruise  
  • The woman died in Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, on Tuesday morning
  • She had been on Rudy Princess cruise, which docked in Sydney on March 19 
  • There have been 133 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed from the Ruby Princess
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

An elderly woman has died in hospital after contracting coronavirus on board the Ruby Princess, taking the nation’s death toll to eight. 

The woman in her 70s, who was one of the first passengers to test positive for the illness, was taken from the cruise ship to hospital after the ship docked in Sydney on March 19.

She died in Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on Tuesday morning and became the eighth  person to die from the virus in Australia. 

Ruby Princess was one of four ships controversially allowed to unload thousands of passengers at Sydney Harbour despite the government having announced a 30-day ban on cruise arrivals just the day before. 

Ruby Princess was one of four ships controversially allowed to unload thousands of passengers at Sydney Harbour despite the government having announced a 30-day ban on cruise arrivals

Ruby Princess was one of four ships controversially allowed to unload thousands of passengers at Sydney Harbour despite the government having announced a 30-day ban on cruise arrivals

New South Wales currently has the highest number of confirmed cases in Australia, with 818 people infected. Nationally, there are 1,894 reported cases

New South Wales currently has the highest number of confirmed cases in Australia, with 818 people infected. Nationally, there are 1,894 reported cases

There have been 107 cases diagnosed in NSW from the Ruby Princess and 26 cases interstate.

NSW Health said doctors on board hadn’t identified any coronavirus cases before docking. 

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 1,894

New South Wales: 818

Victoria: 411

Queensland: 319

Western Australia: 140

South Australia: 134

Australian Capital Territory: 39

Tasmania: 28 

Northern Territory: 5

TOTAL CASES:  1,894

DEAD: 8

‘Five people who had displayed influenza-like illness were tested in Wellington, New Zealand on 14 March, and all were negative for COVID-19.’

Passengers claim they were never told others onboard were sick with flu-like symptoms, despite the pandemic sweeping the globe.  

Reports have since emerged that the ship logged 158 illnesses before it arrived in Sydney and unloaded 2,700 passengers.

Princess Cruises told Daily Mail Australia it did not test for coronavirus on board. 

New South Wales currently has the highest number of confirmed cases in Australia, with 818 people infected. Nationally, there are 1,894 reported cases.

Eight people have died from the illness.

An 81-year-old woman died on Thursday night after coming in close contact with a confirmed case linked to Ryde Hospital.

There have been 107 cases diagnosed in NSW from the Ruby Princess and 26 cases interstate

There have been 107 cases diagnosed in NSW from the Ruby Princess and 26 cases interstate

This graphic details the symptoms of coronavirus, and how they differ to a standard cold or flu

There are currently 12 COVID-19 cases in Intensive Care Units in NSW and of those cases, eight require ventilators, NSW Health said. 

There are two cases of COVID-19 in teachers at Normanhurst West Public School in Thornleigh confirmed on 21 March and 23 March. 

Close contacts at the school have been identified and are being placed in self-isolation. The school will remain closed on Tuesday. 

There are 13 cases in NSW linked to the Ovation of the Seas which docked in Sydney on March 18, and seven cases diagnosed in NSW who were on-board the cruise Voyager of the Seas which disembarked on 18 March. 

There have been a further three positive cases at Dorothy Henderson Lodge, bringing to a total of 11 residents and five staff testing positive for COVID-19. 

There has been one additional case from a University of Sydney rugby match on March 14. 

As the number of cases continues to rise, the government is looking at more extreme ways to slow the spread and relieve pressure on hospitals across the country.

Scott Morrison will meet with health chiefs on Tuesday to discuss a plan for increased restrictions on Australians to fight coronavirus.

Australia appears set to move into ‘stage two’ measures this week, but resist calls for a full lockdown as was ordered in Britain and New Zealand overnight.

Health Minister Greg Hunt deferred questions about what stage two may look like and when it would come in, but said discussions would take place tonight. 

How health bosses are helping battle the coronavirus pandemic: 

Health Minister Greg Hunt announced that Australia was more than doubling vital health resources like masks, ventilators, and test kits. 

Ventilator capacity is at 2,000 but will soon be doubled to 4,000 by better utilising current stock – and will be boosted to 9,000 within weeks.

‘Today work is being done, led by the Chief Scientist Alan Finkel in conjunction with others, which could add an additional 5,000 invasive and non-invasive respiratory and ventilator units to the Australian capacity,’ Mr Hunt said.

Millions of masks will also arrive in Australia soon to keep health workers safe and not transmitting coronavirus to patients or their families.

Mr Hunt said 30 million would arrive within two weeks and another 24 million by the end of April.

A huge increase in testing for coronavirus is also on the horizon after deputy chief medical officer Paul Kelly, admitting the testing guidelines would soon change.

Only those people who had arrived from overseas, or been in contact with someone who had a confirmed case, had qualified to get one of the limited amounts of tests.

Mr Hunt said 97,000 new kits arrived last week and another 100,000 were on the way, 63,000 of which were the highest-grade PCR tests.

‘They will allow us to assist with greater testing of health workers themselves to give them confidence, and, where appropriate, patients,’ he said.

Mr Hunt had also ordered 1.5 million ‘point-of-care tests’ which can give an accurate result in as little as 15 minutes and be used by a GP.

‘As we receive these newly approved – only approved over the weekend and in some cases in the last four hours – what are called point-of-care tests or finger-prick tests, they will be deployed, which will then allow for greater testing of patients within the general practice setting,’ he said.

 

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