A leading hair stylist has warned against using off-the-shelf dyes while in self-isolation, saying DIY hair mistakes could prove expensive to fix. 

Natalia Maxwell, artistic director at Malcolm Murphy Hair, in Leicester, says instead of reaching for home dye kits, people should look to other products to maintain salon hair while in lock-down.

Earlier this week, it was revealed that shelves normally filled with hair dye in Boots and other supermarkets had been stripped bare by people realising that a trip to the hairdressers is unlikely to be on the cards for several months. 

Meanwhile former X Factor celebrity stylist Jamie Stevens, of Jamie Stevens Hair, also warned against cutting your hair at home, sharing a guide to a simple trim ‘only if absolutely necessary’. 

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Natalia Maxwell, artistic director at Malcolm Murphy Hair, in Leicester, said reaching for box dyes, especially ones that contain chemicals such as peroxide, could prove costly to fix if they go wrong (Natalia pictured with a client)

Natalia Maxwell, artistic director at Malcolm Murphy Hair, in Leicester, said reaching for box dyes, especially ones that contain chemicals such as peroxide, could prove costly to fix if they go wrong (Natalia pictured with a client)

If your usual stylist is out of reach, a box dye shouldn’t be your first remedy says Natalia, who advises on trying other products designed to cover roots without the use of damaging peroxide or heavier permanent colours. Dry shampoos, root touch-ups and even raiding your make-up bag for mascaras can all conceal growth. 

Speaking to FEMAIL, Natalia, 34, says: ‘Lock-down is not the time to be messing about with box dyes or cutting your own fringe. You could come out on the other side with a big bill to get a professional to fix your DIY mishaps.’

She says there are ‘some amazing products on the market’ that can gently cover up re-growth including Colour Wow Root Cover Up, a powder that comes in a variety of shades, brushes on to the hair and retails at around £24.

Going, going, gone! People worried about keeping their coloured hair maintained during lock-down stripped bare the shelves of box hair dye in branches of Boots earlier this week after Boris Johnson announced that salons would have to close in the fight against coronavirus

Going, going, gone! People worried about keeping their coloured hair maintained during lock-down stripped bare the shelves of box hair dye in branches of Boots earlier this week after Boris Johnson announced that salons would have to close in the fight against coronavirus

‘For cheaper options, Batiste Hide Me Root Concealer, at £1.99, is hard to beat and even a brown or black mascara, depending on your hair colour, can also do the job’. 

Natalia’s top tips for self-isolation hair 

  • Don’t assume you have to use box dye
  • Look to other products, such as root retouchers that brush colour onto hair
  • Dry shampoo and even mascara can help blend in re-growth
  • Change your hair parting to distract fro the way your colour normally sits 
  • Embrace roots, balayage is on trend

Natalia, explains: ‘My mascara trick is aimed at darker bases and especially Asian hair. 

‘Simply pick out some of the lighter highlights and use the mascara wand to blend out the highlight root using a sweeping technique; this is hiding the obvious root of the highlight and giving you more of an ‘on purpose’ blend. 

‘Using a brown mascara on black hair will give you more of a subtle ombré blend.’

For blondes or people with greying hair, who are fearful of using peroxide at home, then dry shampoo – again Batiste do a popular range for just a few pounds – is also an option says the colour specialist. ‘The powder is enough to disguise the depth or shadow of the natural root re-growth.’ 

Natalia continues: ‘If you have brown natural hair colour to dark brown/black, it’s going to be harder to disguise your roots.  

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em: Stars like Margot Robbie wear roots with confidence

If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em: Stars like Margot Robbie wear roots with confidence

And you might even find you’re accidentally in fashion. ‘The current trends are still about natural tones, root-smudging and, our all-time favourite, balayage.’

‘Meaning ‘sweep’ in French, this fashion for free-hand highlights and a little root re-growth does make things easier! Perfect for self-isolation!’ 

‘So, if you have got darker natural roots and lighter highlights, just smudging one of the above shadows or colour concealers on to the top of the highlighted root will help to blend the line into your natural hair colour so there isn’t so much of a ‘tram line’ effect. This will give you more of a shadowed root.’

If you didn’t make it to the shops in time, and you’re struggling to get online products then simply changing the way you wear your hair can help. 

Says the stylist: ‘Even more simple tricks, such as changing your hair parting can give your colour a whole new look and soften the colour.  

‘Above all wear your roots with confidence, if it works for the stars – actress Margot Robbie has made re-growth look like it’s in fashion – then it can work for you!’

This product, a £1,99 root concealer by Batiste, won't damage hair but will disguise re-growth

Colour Wow Root Cover Up retails at around £24 and brushes colour onto hair

The colour specialist says reaching for products that are less harsh on the hair is a wiser move if you’re looking to keep your hair looking pristine while in self-isolation

Meanwhile leading hairdresser Jamie Stevens told FEMAIL:  ‘If you’re self isolating you might be tempted to have a go at cutting your own hair. 

Jamie Stevens home hair trim tips 

  • Use sharp hairdressing scissors 
  • Put your ring finger and thumb through the holes for this best control
  • Hold the scissors vertically and snip into the ends to thin fringe
  • Don’t try and cut horizontally across your fringe
  • To trim long hair part dry hair down the centre, push the lengths equally over each both shoulders
  • Then pull the length of the hair on one side straight between two fingers with good tension and snip with the point of the scissors into the ends
  • Keep your head straight, then do the other side and check they match 

‘My first advice would be don’t, but if you’re going to do it anyway make sure you stick to trimming, don’t do anything drastic! 

‘Ideally you’ll be using hairdressing scissors which are super sharp – don’t just go at it with a pair from the kitchen. 

‘Put your ring finger and thumb through the holes for this best control. 

‘If you need to take a bit of weight out of a fringe, use a point cutting technique, this is where you hold the scissors vertically and snip into the ends. 

‘Don’t try and cut horizontally across your fringe, and avoid any style that requires blunt or straight lines. Be aware that if you pull hair taut and cut it, it will jump back up, especially if you’ve pulled it tight over your ears. 

‘If you’re just trying to keep split ends at bay on longish hair then keep it soft, we call it dusting when we just remove the very ends to keep it healthy without taking off length.’

He continued: ‘Work on dry hair, wet hair changes as it dries. Part hair down the centre and push the lengths equally over each both shoulders, then pull the length of the hair on one side straight between two fingers with good tension (but don’t pull it at an angle) and snip with the point of the scissors into the ends. 

‘Keep your head straight, then do the other side and check they match.’ 

Former X Factor celebrity stylist Jamie Stevens, of Jamie Stevens Hair, seen on ITV's Lorraine, also warned against cutting your hair at home, sharing a guide to a simple trim 'only if absolutely necessary'

Former X Factor celebrity stylist Jamie Stevens, of Jamie Stevens Hair, seen on ITV’s Lorraine, also warned against cutting your hair at home, sharing a guide to a simple trim ‘only if absolutely necessary’





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