Around 1.4 million vulnerable people in Britain will be told to self-isolate on Monday during the coronavirus outbreak, as the UK death toll hits 144.

Speaking today, Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed that Brits classed as vulnerable will be contacted by the NHS and told what specific actions they need to take to protect themselves from the killer virus. 

The 1.4 million people include anyone with an underlying health condition such as those who usually receive an NHS flu jab and those with weakened immune systems.

Anyone over 70 is also urged to be ‘particularly stringent in following social distancing measures’.

But those who are at even higher risk of getting severely ill from the virus, including recipients of donor organs, those on active chemotherapy or radiotherapy, people with blood cancers and those with severe chest conditions will also now be given more tailored advice.

The coronavirus has killed 144 people and infected 3,269 in Britain so far, with both tolls rising rapidly every day. 

Matt Hancock has revealed that 1.4 million vulnerable people will be told to self-isolate on Monday

Matt Hancock has revealed that 1.4 million vulnerable people will be told to self-isolate on Monday

The coronavirus is ravaging the UK and it has killed 144 people and infected 3,269 in Britain so far, with the numbers expected to increase dramatically

The coronavirus is ravaging the UK and it has killed 144 people and infected 3,269 in Britain so far, with the numbers expected to increase dramatically

Mr Hancock told Sky News: ‘The first thing we’re going to do is set out exactly what conditions that applies to.

‘We expect about 1.4 million people to then get a communication from the NHS to say that they are part of this and what they need to do.

‘Many of these people have pre-existing health conditions and so will be very worried right now, and I understand that, and they’ll need very specific sets of action – for instance, how do you go about still getting your chemo if you have cancer whilst also social-distancing?

‘If you have cancer it’s particularly important to stay away from other people, but you also of course have got to keep going with your chemotherapy.’

He added: ‘These are some of the most difficult and challenging cases so we’ll be getting in contact with them, but if people think that they are on this list and don’t receive a communication from the NHS, then they also need to get in contact.

Who are the 1.4 million vulnerable Brits who will have to self-isolate from Monday? 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has announced that 1.4 million British people will be told to self-isolate from Monday.

These people, termed vulnerable, will be notified by the NHS. 

They include people with an underlying health condition such as those who usually receive an NHS flu jab and those with weakened immune systems. 

Anyone over 70 is also urged to be ‘particularly stringent in following social distancing measures’.

But those who are at even higher risk of getting severely ill from the virus, including recipients of donor organs, those on active chemotherapy or radiotherapy, people with blood cancers and those with severe chest conditions will also now be given more tailored advice.

‘So that is under way, the money was announced for it yesterday. A combination of money to the NHS and money to councils because they’ve got a very big part to play in keeping people safe.’

Mr Hancock also said the Government is looking ‘very, very closely’ at why there is a coronavirus hotspot in the West Midlands after it recorded the highest number of deaths outside London.

And he suggested that tougher measures could have to be brought in if people do not follow the Government’s advice.

He told the BBC’s Breakfast programme: ‘What I can say is that if people follow the advice, stay home, which saves lives, and if they keep apart from others – more than two metres, more than six foot – then we can tackle this and we can turn the tide.

‘The scientists advise that we can turn the tide in 12 weeks if people follow the advice. If people don’t follow the advice, then it’ll be longer and we might have to bring more and tougher measures.’

Mr Hancock said the UK had brought measures in earlier than Italy, which has now suffered more deaths than China.

‘But we’re absolutely clear that, if we need to, we have the powers – in fact, we’ve got a Bill in front of Parliament now to strengthen those powers further.

‘But I think it’s far better if people follow the advice.’

Mr Hancock said some retired medics who return to work in the NHS to fight the coronavirus will be able to come ‘straight back in’.

It comes as the NHS launched its ‘Your NHS needs you’ campaign urging thousands of retired health professionals to come back to the front line.

The warning to vulnerable people comes after both Britain’s Chief Medical Officer and the government’s chief scientific adviser told young adults they would not ‘breeze through’ coronavirus and begged them to stay indoors. 

Despite calls from the government to limit social contact and stay indoors, young people all over the country were spotted enjoying trips to pubs and clubs.

Startling new data released on Wednesday night shows 29 percent of the first 2,500 cases of coronavirus in America were people between the ages of 20 and 44. 

Of that number, 20 percent were hospitalised and 12 percent put in intensive care units. Some 55 percent of the cases were all under the age of 65. 

And foolhardy revellers continue to flock to pubs across the country ignoring calls urging social distancing to prevent the spread of the disease. 

Furious critics today also slammed the boss of JD Wetherspoon as he refused to shut down pubs despite warnings they could be putting lives at risk amid the coronavirus crisis.   

Revellers were still out in Leeds last night despite firm government and expert instructions to stay at home to slow the spread of coronavirus

Revellers were still out in Leeds last night despite firm government and expert instructions to stay at home to slow the spread of coronavirus 

Nightspots in Leeds were far quieter than normal yesterday but some people still decided to have a night out

Nightspots in Leeds were far quieter than normal yesterday but some people still decided to have a night out 

CEO Tim Martin told BBC Radio 4 today that closing pubs was ‘over the top’ in spite of warnings from the government’s chief scientific adviser that bars are a breeding ground for the deadly virus. 

Mr Martin told the BBC that a ‘sensible balance’ was for pubs to open but to implement ‘social distancing’ measures, like no standing at the bar, using cards and sitting at separate tables. 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson yesterday insisted Britain can ‘turn the tide’ on coronavirus within 12 weeks – but issued a stark plea for Londoners to be stricter in obeying the advice on ‘social isolation’.

The PM said he knew how much was being asked of the public as he insisted he was confident the outbreak can be ‘sent packing’.

Two women walk with a McDonald's takeaway in Leeds, where some bars were still welcoming guests last night

Two women walk with a McDonald’s takeaway in Leeds, where some bars were still welcoming guests last night 

He said it was ‘absolutely vital’ to follow guidance on staying out of bars and cafes, and avoiding unnecessary contact.

But he warned that obedience of the rules was ‘patchy’ in some part of London, hinting that there will need to be a tougher crackdown soon – although he stressed it would not be a total lockdown.

‘It is vital that people follow that advice and there is huge evidence that they are,’ Mr Johnson said.

‘But (there is) some evidence that in some parts of the capital it is very patchy and some areas where perhaps people aren’t following it in quite the way we need them to.

‘We may have to consider going further.’



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